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Orange Drum

Burrell Collection Photo Library

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Orange Drum

A drum from c 1940s, decorated with a portrait of King William III on his white horse at the Battle of the Boyne.

The Orange Order was founded in Ireland in 1795 and took its name from William of Orange, King William III (1650-1702), whose forces defeated those of the deposed Roman Catholic King James VII and II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. The victory is celebrated as the key event in establishing political and religious freedom for Protestants in the United Kingdom.

Members of the Orange Order belong to local lodges, each with a flute or accordion marching band. The bands lead the lodge members on Orange parades, when the members walk in procession to church or to mark a significant historical event. The largest march in Glasgow takes place annually on the Saturday before the "Twelfth" - the anniversary of King William's victory on 12 July 1690. Many bands then cross to Northern Ireland to participate in marches there.

Reproduced with the permission of Glasgow City Council, Glasgow Museums

Keywords:
12th of July, drums, Grand Lodge of Scotland, marching, Orange lodges, Orange marches, Orange Order, Orange parades, Orange Walks, orangeism, portraits



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