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The Bricklayers
The Bricklayers

High Street, 1955
High Street, 1955

Orange Walk

Mitchell Library, Glasgow Collection

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Orange Walk

An Orange Walk in progress along Dumbarton Road at Crow Road, 1996. Suits and sashes, flutes and drums, flags and tartan are all in evidence. The mace is in mid-air, in front of the traffic lights.

Many Ulster Protestants are descended from Scottish settlers. Links between the countries were further strengthened by large-scale Irish immigration to Scotland in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Both Protestants and Roman Catholics brought their traditions with them.

Orange walks in Glasgow date from 1872, when an earlier ban was lifted. The largest is traditionally held on the Saturday before the 12th of July, the date of King William of Orange's victory over forces supporting the deposed Roman Catholic King James II at the Battle of the Boyne.

Partick has long been regarded as a hotbed of Orangeism, with the local lodge one of the largest in Scotland. There were serious sectarian riots in the burgh in 1872.

Reference: Illustrations vol.35A, p.10

Reproduced with the permission of Glasgow City Council, Libraries Information and Learning

Keywords:
12th of July, Battle of the Boyne, demonstrations, drums, flags, flutes, Irish, maces, marches, orange lodges, Orange Order, Orange Walks, orangeism, Orangemen, parades, Partick Riots, Protestants, sashes, Union Jack



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